How can we inspire our future leaders in endocrinology and the Society?

Graham Williams with Award winners SfE BES 2017
Prof Graham Williams (centre) with Award winners SfE BES 2017

The Society has launched a new Leadership & Development Awards Programme, to recognise and nurture emerging talent in endocrinology and help Awardees become the future leaders of our discipline. In our interview, Prof Graham Williams, President of the Society for Endocrinology, introduces the Awards Programme and explains how it will be used to inspire and support our leaders of tomorrow, and why early career endocrinologists should apply.

What are the aims of the new Awards programme?

My main priorities as President of the Society have been to ensure that we cater for every member and that we are prepared for the future by being able to develop and respond to change. An important part of that is to support people who are enthusiastic and dedicated to endocrinology so they are equipped to be our future leaders. The Society Officers and Council have introduced the Leadership & Development Awards Programme to help identify these individuals and prepare them; by providing opportunities to learn more about how the Society works, how it is governed, how the committees work and what its strategic aims are. The main purpose is to give everybody an equal opportunity to become more involved, and to ensure that all categories of our membership are well represented in the future.

Towards this goal, the Awards Programme is open to clinicians, clinicians-in-training and research scientists. We are also considering, with the Nurse Committee, how to bring forward a similar initiative that will suit our nurse members, who have different career pathways and needs, and will require an alternative selection process.

The overall aim is to ensure the Society is in a strong position for the future, by securing the engagement of our most dedicated members to help grow and develop our community.

Why do we need an Awards Programme to identify our future leaders?

Our members have always been engaged with endocrinology but the discipline is rapidly changing. It is no longer so easy for people to identify themselves as endocrinologists. There has been a move away from a traditional organ and disease based focus, with increasing emphasis towards interdisciplinary science, whole organism physiology and cellular and molecular signalling. This means many more people are dipping in and out of endocrinology as a discipline, which in turn impacts on the Society. We need to move with the times and ensure we include cross-cutting disciplines that are integrated fully within the Society and endocrine community.

What are your hopes for the Awards Programme in the longer term?

I don’t want to predict the future but I think the Society needs to be agile and responsive as the discipline changes. So we aim to equip Awardees with the skills they need to influence Society strategy and develop our plans as the field advances. Endocrinology is also global discipline and I think that building collaborations with other medical disciplines will be essential both in the UK and also with colleagues all over the world.

What advice would you give to applicants for the Award?

Answer all the questions as completely as possible but most importantly be yourself. When people answer honestly, it allows them to express their true sense of excitement and enthusiasm – and that is what we are looking for – people who are the ‘enthusiastic doers’.  Of course we are looking for those who can demonstrate clinical and scientific excellence in endocrinology, but they need to be excellent communicators and ambassadors as well.

What qualities do you think are important in our future leaders?

I think openness, honesty and the ability to listen to, and to take advice from, others are some of the most important leadership qualities. By sitting on lots of committees you can learn a lot from the chairs. The best ones are great listeners, adept at summing up and have the ability to direct people towards a sensible consensus. Excellent communication skills and wanting to help others are essential qualities for all leaders.

Apart from a dedication to endocrinology, it is important that Awardees are rounded individuals with other outside interests . Working hard is important but it is important to switch off at times and enjoy other interests.  For me this has come from sport and the great outdoors, but whatever it is “work hard and play hard” and you won’t go far wrong!  Having diverse interests also helps with networking, getting to know colleagues and in developing long-lasting friendships that cement the endocrine family together.   

What have you enjoyed most while serving on Committees and as President?

It has to be the people. I feel in a really privileged position to be able to work in the field I love, but serving the Society has extended that experience into being part of a community. Being able to meet and work with like-minded and fantastic people, from different disciplines, from all over the world, and who all want to achieve similar things has been very inspiring.

Who were your early mentors?

I have been fortunate to have had many outstanding mentors over the years but here are the early ones that inspired me into endocrinology and then research. As a medical student, I loved anatomy and was all set to be a surgeon.  However, my first house job was with Professor David London at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham.  He is an eminent clinical endocrinologist and long-standing Society member.  During my time as his houseman, we had lots of interesting endocrine challenges and his infectious enthusiasm got me hooked, so I decided to change and take up a career in endocrinology.

After completing general medical training, I was encouraged to move into the laboratory to work on thyroid hormone action with Michael Sheppard and Jayne Franklyn.  They subsequently encouraged me to branch out and go to Boston to continue my research training at Harvard Medical School, and this move inspired me to pursue an academic career in basic clinical science.  Throughout my career many people have been inspirational and provided support and this never stops; you develop an expanding network that brings new ideas, collaborations and opportunities.  It is here that the Society makes such a difference and will continue to do so as the next generation takes the reins and leads us into the future.

I feel strongly that the new Leadership & Development Awards Programme will serve the future of the Society and the future of endocrinology well.  It will provide unique opportunities for those who apply and I hope it will help to support the careers of our talented trainees.  The applications are open to all so please don’t feel inhibited – just go for it!

Are you an early career endocrinologist interested in developing your leadership skills and becoming more involved with the Society? Applications for the Leadership & Development Awards Programme are open 1 April – 14 May 2019.

Full details of the selection process, benefits and how to apply are on our website.