Resolving Uncertainties in Diagnosis & Management of Thyroid Neoplasia

CARLA MORAN WEB IMAGES 1 (3)Dr Carla Moran is a Consultant Endocrinologist at the University of Cambridge and a convenor of the Society’s Thyroid Endocrine Network. In 2017 she was awarded a Society Themed Scientific Meeting Grant to hold the one-day meeting, Resolving Uncertainties in Diagnosis & Management of Thyroid Neoplasia, on 8 March 2019 at Churchill College in Cambridge. The meeting brought together international and UK experts, as well as practicing clinicians and non-clinical scientists, to discuss advances in the field. Here Carla gives us a report of the day.

Need for the meeting
The landscape of investigation for thyroid neoplasia and management of low risk thyroid cancer is changing. Overascertainment of thyroid nodules has fuelled an epidemic of thyroid neoplasia but the death rate from thyroid cancer is unchanged. Many of these nodules are unnecessarily over-investigated, and if cancer is detected, may be overtreated. It has been suggested that more than 200,000 cases of thyroid cancer have been unnecessarily detected in the USA between 1988 and 2007, and the UK has not avoided this phenomenon of overdiagnosis[1]. In addition, in the UK, almost all radiologically and cytologically indeterminate nodules undergo surgery for diagnosis, resulting in high rates of unnecessary surgery for benign disease. Although our international colleagues are using RNA and DNA diagnostic techniques to stratify the likelihood of malignancy in these nodules, such tests have not been evaluated in UK clinical practice. Pathological definitions of thyroid neoplasia are being revised, such as redesignation of follicular variant of papillary thyroid cancer to noninvasive follicular neoplasm with papillary-like nuclear features (NIFTP). Lastly, management of thyroid cancer is evolving, with surgical extent, radioiodine use and dose and TSH suppression all being tailored to disease risk. This suggests that a stratified approach, with use of better markers (radiological, cytological, molecular) to select nodules for investigation and treatment, is required.

Overview of the day
Current guidelines advocate a multidisciplinary approach to thyroid nodules and cancer, with input from endocrinologists, radiologists, pathologists, surgeons, oncologists and nurse specialists, however no national meetings are held with all these disciplines in attendance. Led by the Society Thyroid network, in partnership with the British Thyroid Association and UK Endocrine Pathology Society, this meeting gathered international and UK experts in all these disciplines, as well as practicing clinicians and non-clinical scientists, to discuss current UK practice and advances in the field. Invitations extended to members of other societies (e.g British Association of Endocrine and Thyroid Surgeons) and patient groups (British Thyroid Foundation, Butterfly Thyroid Cancer Trust) interested in the field.

Topics reviewed included: the thyroid cancer epidemic (Krishna Chatterjee, Cambridge), ultrasonographic classification (Steve Colley, Birmingham), cytological categorisation (Sarah Johnson, Newcastle), molecular pathogenesis (Chris McCabe, Birmingham), nodule molecular diagnostics (Bryan McIver, USA), pathological risk stratification (David Poller, Portsmouth), surgical management of low risk tumours (Dae Kim, London), papillary microcarcinoma (Carla Moran, Cambridge) and stratified management of thyroid cancer (Jonathan Wadsley, Sheffield). Oral presentations demonstrated that high quality UK research is being performed in this field.

Collaboration is key
Collaboration between disciplines was essential for this meeting; the primary speciality leading diagnosis & management of nodules varies widely between centres across the UK, such that specialist society (e.g. endocrine, surgery, pathology, radiology) meetings often exclude many interested professionals; it is exceptionally rare for all relevant disciplines to meet to discuss the topic. Discussing areas of uncertainty identified by all specialties allowed us to compare approaches. Internationally, variation in practice variation is also substantial, most notably with regard to the use of molecular diagnostic techniques. Clinicians in the UK do not have any significant experience of using such diagnostic tools, such that Dr McIver’s experience and opinion of this area was highly informative. Lastly, attendees were individuals experienced and interested in the field; this ensured that discussions were highly applicable and informative.

Funding was crucial
When organising this meeting, funding received from the Society for Endocrinology was invaluable; without it we would not have been able to attract such high-quality speakers from the UK and US. Feedback from the meeting was universally strongly positive, with many attendees expressing a desire to attend a similar meeting in future.

Future
A unique aspect of the meeting was the workshop held the day after the main programme, attended by those interested in pursuing research aiming to identify solutions to challenging areas of current practice. We hope the meeting will inform scientific design of a UK-wide, multicentre, prospective study to evaluate diagnostic utility of new molecular technologies alongside current cytological/pathological practice. In addition, participants in this meeting are likely to be key members of a working group which will formulate national guidance on the diagnosis & management of thyroid nodules in the UK.

References
1. Vaccarella S, Franceschi S, Bray F, Wild CP, Plummer M, Dal Maso L. N Engl J Med. 2016 Aug 18;375(7):614-7.

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