Learn, network, influence change

The best way to predict the future is to create it” Anne Marland, Advance Nurse Practitioner.

Committees have an integral role in guiding the Society – they aim to ensure that members’ interests are served in the best possible way, within the Society and beyond. Dedicated endocrinologists from different career stages and disciplines serve on these Committees, but what drives them to volunteer their valuable time?

Sherwin

Sherwin Criseno, of the Nurse Committee, considered it a matter of career progression. “Being part of a nurse expert group opens up opportunities to exchange knowledge in endocrinology”, he says. ”It also provides a platform for networking among endocrine nurses and endocrine centres, and gives you a chance to contribute in developing educational frameworks and programmes for the nurse community.”

Jeremy

Clinical Committee member, Jeremy Tomlinson, was driven to join a committee by a desire to become more involved with the Society. ”I wanted to highlight specific aspects of patient care, and work together with other endocrinologists to make a difference,” says Jeremy.

Channa

Channa Jayasena, from the Public Engagement Committee, wanted to develop his career whilst playing an active, relevant role in the Society too. ”Committee participation enabled me to establish relationships with scientists and clinicians from endocrine units across the UK, and I got to be involved in the redesign of You and Your Hormones*, the public engagement website.” *New website launching soon

Anne

 

Anne Marland joined the Nurse Committee to challenge herself and become a future-shaping, vision-creating voice for the endocrine nurse community. ”The best way to predict the future is to create it, and being part of a committee offers plenty of exposure and leadership opportunities”, Anne states. ”My favourite part of the experience has been receiving so much peer support, which has been very motivational.”

 

Why do these Committee members think you should get involved?

  • “To share your expertise, offer new perspectives and ideas, and to influence change, as this is vital in every dynamic organisation. It’s an opportunity every nurse should work and aspire for.” Sherwin Criseno
  • “To work towards implementing initiatives that can improve patient care.” Jeremy Tomlinson
  • “To be the voice of your peers and to contribute to the growth of the Society – which means a success for its members and for endocrinology.” Anne Marland
  • “To help promote endocrinology sensibly and responsibly, for example when dealing with the media.” Channa Jayasena

It is now time to submit your nominations – whether this is to put your own name forward, or that of another clinician, nurse, or scientist member, you have until 30 June 2017 to make a difference for your fellow endocrinologists by shaping the future of the Society.

 

Wondering whether there is a place for you?

There is definitely a committee for you, regardless of your previous experience and professional trajectory within endocrinology. Currently, the Society has openings on five of its committees – Clinical, Nurse, Programme, Public Engagement and Science – as well as in the Early-Career steering group and the Corporate Liaison Board sub-committee.

If you want even more insight on the value of being part of a committee, members Stephanie Baldeweg, Kim Jonas and Kate Lines told us about their committee journeys in the spring issue of The Endocrinologist.

Learning new techniques and expanding horizons in South Africa

The Society of Endocrinology is eager to help you drive your career forward and, in line with this, the Practical Skills Grant is an opportunity not to be missed. This grant enables scientists in training to visit other labs to learn new techniques, so that they can return home with an improved skill-set and plenty of research collaboration potential!

Here is the story of Dr Naomi Brooks, Senior Lecturer at the University of Stirling, who is interested in exercise physiology, muscle biology and nutrition. In 2015, she was one of the Practical Skills Awardees and travelled to South Africa to learn a challenging lab technique from world-leading experts…

Naomi Brooks blog
Dr Naomi Brooks, Senior Lecturer at Stirling University

“My application to the Society for Endocrinology Practical Skills grant was inspired by my previous success in winning a Society Early Career Grant. I chose Prof Kathy Myburgh’s lab, in the Physiological Sciences Muscle Group in Stellenbosch University, South Africa. I was aware that the particular technique I wished to learn was difficult and that the Myburgh Laboratory had detailed knowledge and success with it. I had previously worked with the Myburgh group as a post-doctoral fellow. Since I knew the group and identified the potential for collaboration, the choice to return to Stellenbosch was key for my career at that stage.

Stellenbosch is a beautiful town surrounded by mountains and vineyards. I was there during the spring and the weather was kind, not too hot, which allowed me to walk to work every day from my local accommodation. During my work week I would spend time in the lab, either with colleagues or writing and reflecting by myself. When away from the busyness of academia, I visited local areas and enjoyed the beautiful African outdoors and hospitality, and I still had time to write papers and put ideas together for grant applications!

The Practical Skills Grant enabled me to investigate a number of different methods for stem cell isolation and primary cell growth. I was able to see the technique demonstrated, trouble-shoot and have discussions about the procedure and its applications. As a result of this, the cell culture laboratory at my home institution is currently considering building collaborations with molecular investigators to apply the technique in our labs. I continue to build my personal and laboratory group skill-set to enhance our work, and thanks to this grant I was able to improve my academic opportunities as a researcher able to integrate both applied and basic research. The experience provided me with an integrated understanding of the technique, which will hopefully translate into more research opportunities and encourage my transition into an established researcher in the field.

When I lived in Stellenbosch as a post-doctoral fellow, I volunteered at an orphanage in Kayamandi, the local township.  I also started a community exercise programme, which was both a research and a community engagement and development programme. Returning to these places was very special. The exercise programme was still running 5 years later, and was coordinated by those working in the community garden project.

Creating and fostering networks and collaborations, both within the UK and overseas, is very important in the world of academia.  I would encourage those wishing to expand their horizons and learn new techniques to apply for the Practical Skills grant; especially amongst those early career researchers, as having “many strings to one’s bow” is important to establish a career.”  Naomi Brooks, Senior Lecturer at the University of Stirling.

What would you do with a Practical Skills Grant? Applications close on 31 October 2017, so better start thinking about it!

Why should you vote for the new ESE President Elect?

A great opportunity for all endocrinologists is coming up, as it will soon be time to vote for the President Elect of the European Society of Endocrinology (ESE). Professor John Wass, former EFES (now ESE) President and past Society for Endocrinology (SfE) Chairman, urges all SfE members not to miss this opportunity to influence the future of the organisation and endocrinology in Europe:

John wass large shot“I write to encourage all SfE members to vote. SfE has always played a major role in supporting ESE and gains greatly from this collaboration; therefore it is important that SfE members who are also ESE members vote in the upcoming ESE elections. SfE is an affiliated society member of ESE and an active member of the ESE Council of Affiliated Societies (ECAS). ESE runs excellent educational meetings across Europe -including its yearly congress-, provides numerous grants for basic and clinical researchers, produces guidelines, and brings together researchers across Europe and beyond as evidenced by the recent successful application for the Endocrine European Reference Network (ERN). ESE is much bigger than the EU, with members from over 90 countries and affiliated societies from over 45 countries. With Brexit on the horizon, there is no more important time to strengthen our academic and clinical links across Europe through supporting ESE. Please vote – it is important for endocrinology.”

The candidates for ESE President Elect are SfE member Prof Richard Ross (UK) and President of the Pituitary Society Prof Andrea Giustina (Italy).

E-vote submissions open until 19 April 2017. Eligible ESE members will be contacted by e-mail with further instructions on how to submit their votes.

Find out more about ESE and the election on the website.

Did you know that SfE members enjoy discounted membership of the European Society of Endocrinology?

 

From small seeds grow mighty oaks: how the Endocrine Nurse community is growing together to share knowledge

Lisa Shepherd, an Endocrinology Advanced Nurse Practitioner at Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust and Chair of the Society for Endocrinology Nurse Committee, discusses continuing education opportunities and the value of networking for endocrine nurses.

Endocrinology is a fascinating but complex area and nurses often work in isolation, so opportunities to develop and update their knowledge, benchmark their practice and network with other nurses are invaluable. The Society for Endocrinology Nurse Committee supports a number of strategies that promote networking amongst the Endocrine Nurse community.

Social media is increasingly used to build professional networks, so the Nurse Committee have set up an invite-only group on Facebook for endocrine nurses, which is a fast and easy way for the community to share protocols and information. Nurse Members of the Society also have a Twitter feed where training opportunities, research and nursing practice can be promoted to the wider community.

Face-to-face networking remains an effective means of sharing experience and learning from others, so a ‘nurses lounge’ was recently introduced at the SfE BES conference, to give nurses a dedicated space to meet each other in person. As many nurses are working in isolation it is valuable to provide a variety of opportunities, across different media that encourages endocrine nurses to support and learn from each other.

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Endocrine Nurse Update (ENU) is coming up soon. This yearly update is designed by nurses for nurses and offers a varied and active programme of endocrinology topics. I am very excited that this year’s ENU will feature the inaugural Endocrine Nurse Award lecture by winner, Nikki Kieffer. This award was introduced to recognise excellent nursing practice that can be shared to advance knowledge and understanding in the discipline. Nikki is an endocrine nurse specialist at Leicester Royal Infirmary and led the project that developed the Competency Framework for Adult Endocrine Nursing. This project is a great example of nurses working together to share best practice and Nikki will deliver the prize lecture at ENU 2017 in March.

There are also great benefits to networking with other closely related communities and this year, for the first time, ENU will include a workshop run collaboratively between clinician and nurse colleagues, Dr Richard Quinton, Dr Channa Jayasena and Dr Andrew Dwyer. Whether you are a nurse new to endocrinology or a nurse with many years of experience, the ENU programme, in combination with Clinical Update has something to offer all. I hope you can join us at the meeting or follow us online, to learn from your colleagues and share your experience.

Nominations for the 2018 Endocrine Nurse Award are open until 16 June 2017, find out more.

Travel grants are available for ENU 2017, apply before 15 March.

View the ENU 2017 programme.

 

Meet your new Society President

 Meet your new President…

 A new era begins for the Society as Professor Graham Williams takes over as President at SfE BES 2016. Associate Editor of The Endocrinologist, Amir Sam, finds out more about Graham’s background, reflections and aspirations for the Society for Endocrinology. The full interview will be published in the winter issue of The Endocrinologist.

Tell us about your background

I worked as an SHO in Kidderminster and did my general medicine rotation at the Queen Elizabeth and Birmingham General Teaching Hospitals. I then got an MRC Training Fellowship with Michael Sheppard and Jayne Franklyn in Birmingham to work on thyroid hormones.  I did a year of my PhD there and then completed it at Harvard Medical School with Reed Larsen and Greg Brent at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, where I also did some of my post-doctoral training.

I came back with an MRC Clinician Scientist Fellowship and started as a Lecturer in Birmingham with a completely empty lab and had to start from nothing!  About six months before I left Boston, I had a meeting with Reed, who was very happy to support me but said that I shouldn’t work on the same subject that he was working on because it was too small a field and it was important I develop my own independence.  He urged me to read the literature and find a new area to pursue.

I had been working on the biochemistry of transcriptional activation by thyroid hormone and retinoid X receptors and wanted to apply the basic science to clinically and physiologically important questions.  I decided to find a relevant thyroid hormone responsive target tissue that wasn’t being studied; most people were working on pituitary, heart and liver and other labs were getting into the brain. I spent a lot of time talking to various people and eventually settled on the skeleton, a clearly important target organ that had not been investigated in the context of thyroid hormones in any detail.  Having not known anything about bone, I had a blank canvas and started from scratch!  In 1995 I was approached by Raj Thakker and James Scott to move to Hammersmith as a senior lecturer.

When did you know you wanted to be an endocrinologist?

When I qualified from medical school I was all set to do surgery, but realised pretty quickly that I did not have the dexterity to be any good.  My first house job was in endocrinology at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham with David London. At the time there were some really fascinating cases, and working with him got me enthused and hooked on endocrinology straight away. He was definitely the biggest influence on my career selection.

By the time you finish your term of office as President, you will have held major roles at the Society for Endocrinology for over a decade.  How has the Society changed over the time?

The financial aspect of the Society has substantially increased over time. When I took over the treasurer’s role the gift aid to the Society from Bioscientifica was around £100,000 per year, and when I ended my term as treasurer it had grown to about £1 million per annum. The Society has grown incredibly in terms of its diversity; it is reaching out further to different countries and continents in a way that was never possible and is now a very professional and superbly run organisation.

How do you see the Society developing over the next few years?

We have a much greater role in education and the development of opportunities for young endocrinologists. I don’t think my plans for the future will be to fix anything in particular because I think the Society is functioning extremely well. We need to develop it further along these roles for the benefit of the next generation. We have to support our younger scientists and clinicians, retain them and hopefully attract more people to the discipline with the ultimate aim of benefiting our patients and endocrine science. We also need to strengthen our international collaborations, both scientifically and clinically.

Post-Radioiodine Graves’ Management: The PRAGMA Study

Petros Perros is a Consultant Endocrinologist at Newcastle Hospitals, and Honorary Senior Lecturer at Newcastle University. He is the Project Lead for the PRAGMA Study, a Society for Endocrinology research project which compares the incidence of dysthyroidism in post-radioiodine patients treated with difference management strategies.

Petros will be presenting the PRAGMA study’s latest findings next week in Brighton, which is hosting this year’s SfE BES conference. Ahead of the event, we asked him to write about the project and why it’s such an important Society project.

For more information, be sure to check out Petros’ talk at 16.45 on Tuesday 8 November in Syndicate One. Our Scientific Programme has more details.

Project Background

Grave’s Disease, an autoimmune condition, is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. Radioiodine (RI) is an effective, safe and cheap treatment for hyperthyroidism, though it results in most patients with RI-treated Graves’ disease requiring life-long thyroid hormone replacement.

Ideally the transition from hyperthyroidism to a stable thyroid status (through thyroid hormone replacement) should be rapid and smooth. However, in practice fluctuations in thyroid status in the first year after RI are not uncommon.

In an attempt to achieve and maintain euthyroidism (in which the thyroid gland is functioning normally) after RI, endocrinologists employ different strategies. These will eventually include the introduction of levothyroxine, a synthetic thyroid hormone chemically identical to thyroxine. The two most typical treatment strategies are:

  • The use of anti-thyroid drugs for a period of time after RI. These are used either alone or in combination with levothyroxine – with levothyroxine is known as the “block and replace” strategy
  • Watchful monitoring and introduction of levothyroxine when required

This variation in management in response to fluctuations in thyroid status following RI was the inspiration for the PRAGMA Study. We set out to determine the extent of thyroid instability after RI, and to explore whether different strategies of management are associated with different degrees of thyroid instability.

The study was funded by the Clinical Endocrinology Trust and was included in the NIHR portfolio.

What has been achieved so far?

Thirty-four hospitals in the UK have recruited 812 patients over 2 years. One of the most striking findings was that a very large proportion of patients – 67.2% – had at least one episode of hypothyroidism within the first year after RI, and 36% had an episode of hyperthyroidism. Patients treated with the “block and replace” regimen after RI were least likely to experience hypothyroidism and gain weight, though hypothyroidism was still experienced in 26% of cases.

What next?

We continue to collect data in the management of this condition. Additional interventions need to be identified and implemented to improve outcomes for patients with Graves’ disease treated with RI, and this study provides us with great possibility.

The level of engagement of colleagues with the PRAGMA Study proves that large scale studies addressing common, simple, clinically relevant questions can be conducted with ease and minimal cost. It is a great asset to the field of clinical endocrinology research.

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SfE BES – Call for abstracts!

The annual Society conference, SfE BES, takes place this year in Brighton on 7-9 November 2016. It’s a great chance to network with colleagues, showcase your work and explore new research in your area of endocrinology. Our programme of events is varied yet specific – bringing together the best of basic science, clinical investigation and clinical practice, you have the chance to expand your horizons into other parts of the field whilst also attending those lectures which are really specific to you.

The submission system for abstracts is open until midnight on Wednesday 22nd June – so you have more than enough time to polish your final abstract and send it along. It’s not just a chance to show your colleagues across the whole field of endocrinology what you’ve been working on – it’s a chance to tell them why what you’ve been working on is important.

Last year at SfE BES, a great programme highlight was a session entitled ‘Evolving model systems for complex tissues’, which was chaired by Kevin Doherty and Shareen Forbes. In the ’90s, manipulation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) was something of a new thing. It was anticipated that the ability to grow human tissues in culture using hESCs would provide incredible model systems for drug development, toxicity testing and cell therapy.

However, it wasn’t until 2005 that reliable markers had been developed and a significant number of important signalling pathways had been elucidated in the path to differentiation. By this point, some ten years later, finally a tool box existed for nearly every tissue type. This lead to some of the first clinical trials, using pluripotent cells to treat age-related macular degeneration. However, liver disease, diabetes and neurodegeneration were still elusive and challenging goals.

By 2014, fully functional human beta cells has been generated, and they took only 45 days and 7 stages in culture. This was a hugely exciting moment for diabetologists and researchers across the world. But then, of course, the question sprang up: could they be used as a source of islet cells for replantation? Or would they merely serve as an invaluable model?

At Kevin and Shareen’s BES session, they gave a detailed overview of both the background to the field of complex tissue model systems, and the current state of basic science and clinical research, highlighting very recent advances, and discussing the potential future.

The stem cell field continues to expand rapidly. 2016 has already been the year that Chinese scientists grew functioning mouse spermatozoa from skin cells – these went on to fertilise egg which developed into embryos and grew to successful progeny. What will the second half of 2016 bring?

With over 1000 delegates, 100 abstract lectures, 10 plenary lectures, and an evening of awards and prizes, SfE BES is the best place for you to spread the word on your research, and meet the colleagues that you want to work with in future. Your lecture might be the one were talking about all the way into June 2017.

So submit your abstract now through our submission system. Submissions close on Wednesday 22nd June at midnight.brighton 2

See you in November!