World Health Day: Beat Diabetes

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There are currently 422 million people in the world who have diabetes. This figure is expected to double in the next 20 years. In light of this alarming trend, the World Health Organization is dedicating 2016 World Health Day: Beat Diabetes to raising awareness of this life-threatening condition.

For World Health Day we decided to raise awareness by asking two prominent diabetes experts about their work and the hurdles that they feel need to be overcome to beat this disease.

 

Dr Sof AndrikopoulosSof

Dr Sof Andrikopoulos is President of the Australian Diabetes Society and a Senior Research Fellow at the University of Melbourne. He is also Editor-in-Chief of two of our journals: Journal of Endocrinology and Journal of Molecular Endocrinology.

What is the focus of your current research?

My research strives to understand the genetic and biochemical mechanism(s) associated with beta cell dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. We recently identified a novel genetic cause for this dysfunction in a preclinical model (Andrikopoulos et al. J. Endocrinol 228:61-73, 2016).

How does your research have the potential to translate to a clinical setting?

While there has been a significant increase in drugs available to treat type 2 diabetes, none currently target beta cell dysfunction – the underlying cause of the disease. My group aims to address this.

Do you think the day will arrive when we’ll have beaten diabetes?

I truly believe that we will reach a point where we are able to effectively manage diabetes and avoid the associated life-threatening complications. This will be achieved by research focussed on understanding the genetic cause(s) of the disease.

What is the greatest highlight of your career so far?

My greatest achievement by far is to have mentored a number of scientists who are now forging their own independent careers in medical research.  Mentoring is the most important activity I engage in and I am extremely proud of all the scientists I have worked with.

 

Professor Nick Finer

Nick FinerAs a Consultant Endocrinologist at University College Hospital in London, Professor Nick Finer treats patients affected by diabetes and its complications. Here, Nick describes the progress that has been made during his career and his thoughts on the future of diabetes.

What have been the biggest advances in the field of diabetes in the last 20 years? 

Technologies such as glucometers, together with pen devices for insulin delivery, have allowed people with diabetes to achieve ever better glycaemic control. Cardiovascular risk management via statins has also had a huge impact on health improvement.

What are the biggest challenges you face in the treatment of diabetes?

Encouraging patients to understand that diabetes is never ‘mild’ and thus motivating them to reduce their personal health risks.

What do you feel needs to happen to enable us to beat diabetes?

We have to tackle the still growing devastation from ever-increasing obesity prevalence. Governments, societies and individuals have to reverse the unbridled proliferation of cheap, unhealthy food.

What is the greatest highlight of your career so far?

Seeing and being at the forefront of the transition of obesity from a curiosity to a cutting-edge scientific and clinical discipline.
To find out more about diabetes, visit You & Your Hormones, the official public information website of the Society for Endocrinology.