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Meet the Endocrinologist: Matthew Simmonds, expert in pancreatic transplant genomics

Meet the Endocrinologist: Meet Dr Matthew Simmonds a Senior Lecturer in Biomedical Science at the University of Lincoln. His research is focused on the genetics of pancreatic transplant function and he will be presenting at the Early Career session at SfE BES 2018, 19-21 November in Glasgow. In our latest interview, he tells us more about his work and what he is looking forward to at the SfE BES 2018 conference.

Can you tell us a little about your current position and research?

I am a Senior Lecturer at the University of Lincoln where I have been now for just over two years.  My research career has revolved around trying to identify genetic contributors to a series of autoimmune endocrine diseases including autoimmune thyroid disease and type-1 diabetes.  My current research is specifically focused on looking at genetic predictors of long-term pancreas transplant function in people with severe type 1 diabetes.

What inspired you in to this field?

The immune system is amazing and without it we would never have survived and evolved on this earth. What I find so interesting about the autoimmune endocrine diseases is how the immune system, which is meant to protect us, actually starts to attack parts of the body leading to changes in how the endocrine system works.  I am passionate about understanding how disease pathways are triggered/progress and how we can use these insights to inform better treatments for people with these different conditions.

What do you think are the biggest challenges in your field of research?

I think the major challenge within pancreas transplantation is both the number of donor organs available for transplantation into people with severe type-1 diabetes and trying to ensure that the transplanted organ remains functional throughout the recipient’s life to ensure the benefits these transplants provide, of retuning insulin production and halting/reversing secondary diabetes related complication in that person, remain for as long as possible.

What do you think will be the next major breakthrough in your field?

I think both the advances being made in using induced pluripotent stem cells, combined with gene editing, to create new beta cells, will provide unparalleled new opportunities for transplantation purposes. Combined with the decreased costs around genome and other proteomic screening for patients and our increased understanding of how genetic variation impact upon autoimmunity and transplant success this will give us new understanding of disease progression and provide better individual tailoring of therapeutics.

What will you be doing at SfE BES 2018 in Glasgow?

Well as you have asked – nothing like a bit of shameless plugging – I will be doing a talk on the Tuesday as part of the Early Careers session ‘Navigating the Academic Pathway’.  My talk is entitled ‘The lectureship route’ where I will be providing some insights into this career pathway, the challenges and benefits of this route and some tips on how to be get such a position.

What are you looking forward to at this year’s conference?

I think as an early career researcher I loved going to conferences to be able to present my work and network with others working in the field – which is the same reason I enjoy attending conferences to this day. Whilst there are lots of fantastic talks, plenaries and other sessions throughout the conference with something to suit everyone’s research interests, one thing I would suggest to early career researchers is to take time to speak to other early career researchers at the poster sessions and after their talks.  You would be surprised how much you have in common with other researchers and how random conversations at conferences can lead to new collaborations and possibly job offers in the future.

Who do you most admire and why?

 I have been really lucky to have worked with some of the most amazing researchers in diabetes and endocrinology throughout my career so far – both in the centres I have worked and through numerous collaborations. I have been very lucky to have some amazing mentors throughout the years, and think that whatever stage in your career you are at it is important to keep listening, learning and being inspired by researchers at every level.

What words of wisdom do you have for someone starting out in research?

These type of questions always make me feel old.  Joking aside, I think the best advice I can give to any early career researcher is to think about where you want your career to go but don’t be so rigid in your approach that you may miss out on some unexpected opportunities that come your way. Also listen to your gut feeling about career decisions.  Whilst is it perfectly normal to be scared to take on new challenges be it new techniques, moving into different project areas or new jobs, sometimes you instantly know if something is a good or a bad move. From my own experience I have learnt that sometimes saying no to something that is not right for you is as important as the opportunities you say yes to.

You can hear Dr Simmonds presentation, “The lectureship route” on Tuesday 20 November, as part of the Early Career: Navigating the Academic Pathway session at 16:00-17:30. Find out more about the scientific programme for SfE BES 2018.

 

 

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Meet the Endocrinologist: Interview with Prof Antonio Vidal-Puig

Group Photo - June 2017

Meet Professor Antonio Vidal-Puig, endocrinologist and Society for Endocrinology Medal winner for 2017. Prof Vidal-Puig is based at the Institute of Metabolic Sciences, Cambridge University and at Addenbrooke’s Hospital, where his outstanding research, focusing on the link between obesity and associated metabolic complications, has earned him this award, to be presented the annual conference, SfE BES 2017, in Harrogate, 6-8 November 2017. Learn more about his endocrine journey in this exclusive interview.

Q: Tell us a little about your career so far and how you ended up in Cambridge.

Originally from Spain, I studied medicine and trained in endocrinology at Valencia Medical School and Granada Medical School. I held post-doctoral positions in Boston at the Massachussetts General Hospital and Beth Israel Hospital/Harvard Medical School from 1992-1999. There I had excellent mentors including Jeff Flier, Brad Lowell, David Moller and Leo Krall. This was a very intense, exciting and uncertain period, at the epicentre of major discoveries in the field of obesity. This was a period that defined my career, scientific focus, approach to science and reinforced my values. I have been developing my career in the UK, since arriving at Cambridge University in 2000, and now have an established laboratory and have become a Professor of Molecular Nutrition and Metabolism.

Q: Tell us more about your research that led to you being awarded the Society Medal

The lab is interested in why obesity results in diabetes, insulin resistance, fatty liver and ischaemic heart disease, in order to find ways of preventing these complications.

The key concept of our programme is lipotoxicity, which links obesity-related metabolic complications with the excessive accumulation of lipids outside adipose tissue, in organs including muscle, liver and heart. From the concept of lipotoxicity we have developed three main research directions:

  • understanding how the adipose tissue works, with the aim of improving its function and ensuring that lipids remain in adipose. This led to the development of our “adipose tissue expandability hypothesis”, which is now widely accepted by the scientific community
  • developing strategies to burn the excess lipids and prevent lipotoxicity through activation of brown fat
  • promoting that the quality of dietary lipids should be as healthy as possible, to prevent toxic effects.

My Medal Lecture at SfE BES 2017 will summarise our contribution to these three directions.

Q: What are you particularly looking forward to at SfE BES 2017?

I will use this conference for updating clinical aspects of my work. The presentation quality is always good and helpful. One session I am really curious about is Workshop 1: Tissue Engineering for Regenerative Medicine in Endocrinology. I think technology is essential to retain a competitive position in research and the topics presented are highly transferable and of interest. I think tissue engineering approaches to increase brown fat mass could be really helpful in preventing obesity and diabetes, I am curious about the concept and possibilities of using 3D bioprinting.

Q: What have been your career highlights so far?

I feel content about my career progression. I consider highlights to be our best pieces of research; our papers tend to be quite comprehensive and we believe they make important contributions. I think for this reason these contributions are well respected by our colleagues. Our reputation as a lab is important for us. Also as a proud introvert, I have not touted our highlights and have not needed to for our professional highlights to be widely acclaimed, however I do understand that it is important to make the public aware of their implications. Also, as a laboratory leader I know that to disseminate these highlights is important for the careers my lab members. In this respect, winning the Society for Endocrinology Medal is a highlight that reflects the quality and commitment of the present and past members of the laboratory.

At a more personal level, I admit I have an aesthetic approach to science. I enjoy understanding and identifying sophisticated mechanisms, developing models that explain reality and learning how biological systems self-regulate. I don’t think this is unusual amongst endocrinologists. Also, becoming a Professor at Cambridge University was a moment of satisfaction I shared with my colleagues and family. In some ways my career has provided me with professional freedom, which is a key value for me, beyond other motivations, such as power or fame, that I have always found energy draining and restrictive of my autonomy.

Q: What do you think are the biggest challenges in your research area right now?

I think a big challenge in my research area, and others, is how to extract value from the excessive information generated by recent technological advances. Our challenge is how to analyse this information to prioritise the types of mechanistic validation that are necessary for estimating its relevance. Also, it is not only the amount of data, but the amount of unnecessary noise coming from poor quality research that makes this task more difficult.

Q: What are your future plans for your work & career?

As you become more senior in science, you often suffer the disadvantage that your professional horizon is shorter. However, this position also has the advantage that you can be more selective in your choice of projects, with more freedom to take risks. I think my laboratory in this respect is quite entrepreneurial, we are innovating by entering new fields/technologies, which I think is important for remaining competitive.  For example, we have opened a new lab at Sanger, funded by the European Research Council to work on stem cells and adipose tissue. We are also developing two new programmes of research; one in Nanjing focused on murine models of fatty liver, and another in Bangalore focused on adipose tissue stem cell biology to model obesity and diabetes in India. These are exciting challenges that will provide opportunities for my younger associates in their future careers.

Q: Who do you most admire professionally?

I have learned a lot from many of my mentors, colleagues and trainees. In some way these experiences have shaped my values and my strong views about science and leadership. For example, I have always admired the intellectual rigour and scientific honesty of Brad Lowell. I admired the consistency and confident leadership of Jeff Flier and the legacy of Daniel Lane, who developed many academic scientists in his lab to share his cultural values and collegiality, which they now disseminate to the next generations. I find this very impressive.

Q: Any words of wisdom for aspiring endocrinologists out there?

Endocrinology is not a specialty that will make you rich, but it is a specialty where you can fulfill your intellectual scientific needs and enjoy the human aspect of practicing medicine. It is very satisfying because your patients get better and, given that treatments are required long term, an important factor in the success depends on establishing an empathetic relationship with them. You will get to know many of your patients well, from whom you will receive gratitude and a sense of meaning and fulfillment. In this respect it is a very rewarding profession.

Q: What do you think will be the next major breakthrough in your field?

I think real breakthrough with long term impact requires deep knowledge and new technologies, I have become quite sceptical about quick or easy breakthroughs that address complex problems. It is important to understand how regulatory systems operate, to learn what the adaptive changes of the organism or cell to maintain normality are, and to determine the intrinsic capacity of these systems to recover normality if the early factors of the disease are removed. For this reason, we focus on early disease events, aiming to prevent or reverse excessive damage to the homeostatic system and regain metabolic control. In this sense, we think it is as important to learn how the problem occurs as it is to learn the trigger and why it occurs. In our field I think understanding how lipids mediate disease could be used for prevention, early diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

You can hear Prof Vidal-Puig’s Society for Endocrinology lecture on Wednesday 8 November, 15:45-16:45, and see the full scientific programme for SfE BES 2017.

Meet the Endocrinologist: Maria-Christina Zennaro, expert in the genetic mechanisms of aldosterone-related disorders

Meet Maria-Christina Zennaro, a professor in the Paris Cardiovascular Research Center at the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (Inserm).  She specialises in genetic mechanisms of aldosterone-related disorders. She has been awarded the SfE European Medal and will be delivering her Medal Lecture at SfE BES 2018, 19-21 November in Glasgow. In our latest interview, she tells us more about her work and what she is looking forward to at the SfE BES 2018 conference.

Can you tell us a little about your current position and research?

I am a research professor heading the team exploring the genetic mechanisms of aldosterone-related disorders at the Paris Cardiovascular Research Centre at the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (Inserm). My team is interested in unravelling the genetic and genomic mechanisms of aldosterone-related disorders, particularly primary aldosteronism, by combining clinical work with genome-wide strategies and mechanistic studies in cell and animal models. I am also an associated investigator at the Genetics Department of the European Hospital Georges Pompidou (HEGP) in Paris, where I coordinate the genetic diagnosis of pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 and primary aldosteronism at the genetics laboratory, which is the French referral centre for the genetic diagnosis of these diseases.

What inspired you into endocrinology?

I received my MD and board certification in endocrinology at the University of Padova (Italy) and completed a PhD in molecular endocrinology at the University Pierre et Marie Curie in Paris. I had the chance to have great mentors, in particular Decio Armanini, who shared his passion for research with me, and John W Funder, who has supported my career ever since. In Paris, I had the chance to work with major players in the field of arterial hypertension and aldosterone, setting the basis for my future research.

What are you most proud of in your career so far?

After obtaining a tenured position as an Inserm researcher twenty years ago, I developed my own research group, which is now benefitting from the outstanding environment of the Paris Cardiovascular Research Centre and HEGP. I am particularly proud of having been able to create our research group, with the successive recruitment of two great researchers, with whom I have taken pleasure in sharing my working career with for many years.

What are you presenting in your Medal Lecture at SfE BES 2018?

I will present an update on the genetic and molecular mechanisms involved in the development of primary aldosteronism. In particular, I will summarise our current knowledge on the genetics of primary aldosteronism, notably our recent paper identifying a new gene in early onset primary aldosteronism, and discuss the pathogenic mechanisms leading to increased aldosterone production and cell proliferation. I will also discuss perspectives for clinical management of patients and open questions to be addressed by future research.

What are you looking forward to at this year’s conference?

There are many great sessions on the adrenal gland, featuring world-leading experts in the field, which I highly recommend. There are exciting plenary lectures and I am looking forward to hearing about the influence of the microbiome in endocrine disease on Tuesday afternoon.

What do you think are the biggest challenges in endocrinology right now?

I think the challenges are threefold. First, the scientific challenge of improving our understanding of common and rare endocrinological disorders. Second, to be able to efficiently transfer this knowledge to patient care, in particular the knowledge generated from large-scale ‘omics’ studies. Improving diagnosis, management and implementation of precision medicine in clinical practice is really important, and should be affordable and available for everyone anywhere. Lastly, but not least, a major challenge is gathering funding for research in endocrinology.

What do you think will be the next major breakthrough in your field?

I hope it will be the development of new diagnostic procedures for endocrine hypertension, which will have a major impact on treatment of those patients and prevention of cardiovascular and metabolic complications, improving their quality of life.

What do you enjoy most about your work?

Most certainly it is the scientific exchanges with my colleagues all over the world and mentoring young people to transmit my knowledge with passion to future generations.

Who do you most admire professionally?

I have had the chance to meet many extraordinary colleagues, many of whom I admire for different reasons. I particularly admire a few of my senior colleagues and mentors: I consider it a great opportunity to meet them every year at different meetings around the world, to have discussions with them and benefit from their profound scientific knowledge and incredible experience, especially when they talk about experiments they did 30 years ago!

Any words of wisdom for aspiring researchers out there?

Endocrinology requires a deep understanding of the complexity of endocrine feedbacks and interactions throughout the body. Research in the field of endocrinology is exciting, as it addresses the many questions we have on the mechanisms regulating endocrine physiology and hormone action. In this sense, it is also very diverse, ranging from genetics to cellular and molecular mechanisms, not only in hormone-producing organs but also in the multitude of target organs.

You can hear Professor Zennaro’s European Medal Lecture, “Molecular mechanisms in primary aldosteronism” on Wednesday 21 November, in the Lomond Auditorium at 15:30-16:00. Find out more about the scientific programme for SfE BES 2018.

Meet the Endocrinologist: Ursula Kaiser, expert in neuroendocrine regulation of puberty

Meet Ursula Kaiser, Professor at Harvard Medical School and Chief of the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Hypertension at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Her research is focused on neuroendocrine regulation of puberty, reproductive health and fertility. She has been awarded the SfE International Medal and will be delivering her Medal Lecture at SfE BES 2018, 19-21 November in Glasgow. In our latest interview, she tells us more about her work and what she is looking forward to at the SfE BES 2018 conference.

Can you tell us a little about your current position and research?

At Harvard Medical School and as Chief of the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Hypertension at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, I lead and direct a group of over 60 clinical and research endocrinologists at a large academic medical center. My laboratory studies the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying the neuroendocrine regulation of reproductive development and function, with an emphasis on the mechanisms regulating gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and gonadotropin production. We use translational approaches including clinical and laboratory observations in humans, investigations in mouse models, and molecular and cellular studies to elucidate the molecular and biological underpinnings of reproductive disorders.

Can you tell us a little about what inspired you into endocrinology?

I grew up in Canada, where I received my undergraduate degree in biology at University of New Brunswick followed by my medical degree at University of Toronto. Early in medical school, I became fascinated by the feedback loops of endocrinology and by the many systems affected by hormones, and was quickly convinced that endocrinology was my calling. I completed my clinical training and licensure in internal medicine and in endocrinology in Toronto, but became intrigued by the molecular underpinnings of endocrine disorders. I moved to Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital to pursue basic science research training in the regulation of gonadotropin gene expression under the mentorship of Dr. William Chin in the Genetics Division. My initial research focused on the mechanisms of differential regulation of luteinising hormone and follicle stimulating hormone; more recently, I have moved “further up” the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis to study the neuroendocrine regulation of GnRH secretion.

What you are most proud of in your career so far?

Scientifically, I’m most proud of our discovery that mutations in a gene known as MKRN3, or Makorin Ring Finger Protein 3, cause central precocious puberty. This was the first major genetic cause of precocious puberty to be identified and is now recognized to explain close to half of all cases of familial central precocious puberty. This discovery has identified the first known inhibitor of human GnRH secretion and has opened up an entirely new field of investigation. It is also important translationally and has highlighted the role of genetic imprinting in the control of human pubertal timing. I’m particularly proud of this accomplishment because of its collaborative and multidisciplinary nature – it has involved an international network of collaborators and has helped to launch the careers of several of our trainees.

What are you presenting in your Medal Lecture at SfE BES 2018?

I will be talking about our discovery of the role of MKRN3 in the timing of puberty and the link of loss of function mutations in MKRN3 with central precocious puberty.  In particular, I will expand on the studies we have performed since discovering this link in order to better understand the role and mechanisms of action of MKRN3 in puberty onset.

What are you looking forward to at this year’s conference?

I’m particularly looking forward to seeing my British and other international friends and colleagues, to catch up and hear about their new work, and to discuss ongoing and potential future collaborations. One thing that I would recommend to others is to take maximum advantage of the opportunity to catch up with new advances in their fields and to network with colleagues. It’s a great opportunity to meet new colleagues and make new connections!

What do you think are the biggest challenges in endocrinology right now?

Two of the biggest challenges in endocrinology are addressing the rising rates of obesity and diabetes mellitus. The prevalence of these metabolic disorders is rapidly increasing, not only in developed countries, but also in the developing world. We need more research to better understand the pathogenesis of these metabolic disorders. Interestingly, neuroendocrinology is increasingly recognized to play a key role in metabolic disorders, with neuropeptides and neural circuits playing key roles both in appetite and energy homeostasis, as well as linking metabolism to other areas of physiology such as reproduction and growth.

What do you think will be the next major breakthrough in your field?

I believe that neuroscience is an incredibly exciting area that is poised for major breakthroughs. The combination of advances in human genetics together with advances in our abilities to study the brain are allowing neural circuits to be mapped in detail and are leading to new discoveries in mechanisms underlying neurological and neuroendocrine diseases. I am hopeful that these advances will in turn lead to new treatments for these disorders. Endocrinology is particularly important for our understanding of sex differences in predisposition to and responses to treatments for neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.

In addition, advances in our understanding of neuroendocrine circuits will lead to new therapies targeting neuroendocrine pathways controlling metabolism and reproduction. The recent discovery that menopausal vasomotor symptoms (i.e., hot flashes) are mediated by the neuropeptide, neurokinin B, and that neurokinin B antagonists can effectively target and reduce the frequency of these vasomotor symptoms, is a great example of such a breakthrough.

What do you enjoy most about your work?

I’m so fortunate to have one of the best jobs in the world! My work is intellectually and socially stimulating. No two days are alike – between teaching students, doing research, and seeing patients, I’m learning new things every day. I have wonderful opportunities to meet and interact with a broad variety of interesting and kind people.

Any words of wisdom for aspiring endocrinologists out there?

Endocrinology is a fantastic field! The diversity of endocrine disorders and the multi-system effects of hormones leads to a very integrative field that is intellectually stimulating and satisfying. There is still so much to be learned and so many research questions to be answered. Furthermore, the endocrine specialty provides the opportunity to have sustained, long-term relationships with patients and to observe the impact of treatment on their health and quality of life.

You can hear Professor Kaiser’s International Medal Lecture, “Puberty: what are the neuroendocrine triggers for the biological end of childhood?” on Monday 19 November, in the Lomond Auditorium at 14:15-14:45. Find out more about the scientific programme for SfE BES 2018.

Meet the Endocrinologist: Jeremy Turner, expert in bone and calcium endocrinology

Prof Jeremy Turner is a consultant endocrinologist at Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. He has a particular clinical interest in calcium and metabolic bone disorders and is a convenor of the Society’s Bone and Calcium Endocrine Network.

What inspired you into endocrinology, and bone and calcium in particular?

I was fortunate enough to undertake my early postgraduate training in endocrinology at the (then) Royal Post Graduate Medical School/Hammersmith Hospital in the mid-1990s, where I worked with some inspirational colleagues in the bone and calcium field. I then went on to undertake an MRC clinical training fellowship in Raj Thakker’s lab in Oxford. The latter experience firmly cemented the place of calcium and bone endocrinology in my endocrine repertoire.

Can you tell us a little about your current work?

I have been consultant endocrinologist for the last 9 years in Norwich and was more recently promoted to honorary professor at the Norwich Medical School. I run the clinical metabolic bone/calcium service in Norwich with my great friend and colleague Professor Bill Fraser. We have established a good reputation for our clinical service and referrals come in from far and wide. We provide over 120 consultant delivered lists per annum and have succeeded in getting Norwich recognised as a Paget’s Association Centre of Excellence.

Historically, bone and calcium disorders have been somewhat “Cinderella” conditions in the wider context of endocrine services and I particularly enjoy advocating for this population of patients and developing services in this area. I am medical advisor to Hypopara UK and of course promote the charity and its work to our large population of hypoparathyroid patients. I have led the writing of a number of clinical guidelines including a post-operative hypocalcaemia avoidance and management guideline, have developed services such as a one-stop osteoporosis clinic and am currently working with colleagues in Cambridge to set up a rare bone disease network in the East of England. Naturally, the achievement I am proudest of is being appointed as a network convenor for the Bone and Calcium Endocrine Network of the Society for Endocrinology!

Over the last decade or so, what do you think have been the most useful/impactful advances in bone and calcium?

As a pure endocrinologist, the single most exciting advance has been the arrival of recombinant human parathyroid hormone (PTH) for the treatment of hypoparathyroidism. Finally, clinical endocrinologists now have a “full set” of replacement hormones to use in hormone deficiency states and this day has been a long time coming. However, no answer to this question would be complete without reference to the arrival of the many new therapies for osteoporosis and perhaps, as importantly, the expansion in understanding of treatment of osteoporosis that has occurred in recent years. This has included appreciation of risks of treatments as well as benefits, how to use the different therapies, where they fit in relative to each other, the growing use of bone markers, fracture risk calculators and so on – all of which are driving more nuanced, considered and targeted clinical approaches to treatment of osteoporosis.

What do you think are the biggest challenges faced by endocrinologists?

In my opinion, the biggest challenge faced by all endocrinologists has to be management of remorselessly growing demand. The population is expanding and ageing and at the same time more treatments are available across endocrinology. Awareness is growing amongst patients and general practitioners and thus referral rates are rising. This is a good thing, it means that our specialty is able to help more and more people for whom perhaps help was not always available in the past and also means that the place of endocrinology in clinical medicine as a whole is better recognised and appreciated. However, it is up to us to manage this demand, find new ways to see and treat as many people as possible and to modernise aspects of our practice. Not changing how we work is probably not an option!

Are there any controversies in bone and calcium endocrinology?

Of course there are many controversies but one of the greatest at the moment is probably the recent recognition of the end-of-treatment effect of anti-RANK ligand therapy whereby fracture rates may rise quite fast in some patients upon withdrawal of this therapy. This is a very pressing clinical challenge as numbers on this exciting and novel treatment are quite large, we have been using this for a period of time that means that some are already arriving at what was originally intended to be the end of treatment but now we know that simply stopping the treatment is probably not the best option for many patients. At the same time, there is a relative lack of evidence base to inform us with regard to what we should be doing next. While it is helpful that some guidance is beginning to emerge, this is largely based on expert opinion and it will be very interesting to see how this controversy unfolds over the next few years.

What do you enjoy about being an Endocrine Network convenor?

 So far it is early days but I am enjoying working with my co-convenor (Caroline Gorvin), with colleagues in the society and am looking forward to playing my own very small part in further raising the profile of bone and calcium medicine and research within endocrinology.

Do you have any words of wisdom for aspiring endocrinologists?

Yes, this is perhaps the easiest question; Enjoy your endocrinology! If you are enjoying your clinical practice you will be happy and more importantly your patients will be happy, correctly diagnosed and correctly treated.

 

The Endocrine Networks are platforms for knowledge exchange and collaboration amongst basic and clinical researchers, clinical endocrinologists and endocrine nurses. The Networks enable members to discuss and find solutions to challenges within their specialist field.

To join an Endocrine Network login to the ‘My profile’ section of the Members’ Area and select ’Endocrine Networks’.

Meet the Endocrinologist: Petros Perros, thyroid disease expert

Dr Petros Perros is Honorary Clinical Senior Lecturer at Newcastle University, and a consultant in endocrinology at Newcastle Hospitals. His clinical and research interests focus on the study of thyroid disease, and he is a convenor of the Society’s Thyroid Network.

What inspired you into medicine and why did you focus on thyroid disease?

I got inspired into medicine through observing the impact of successful treatments on people’s lives and the misery brought onto those who are incurable. Appreciating that science was the key to solving those problems was my main motivator to pursue a career in medicine.

As a student, I was attracted by the relevance of endocrinology in every system and organ, and the beauty and elegance that was revealed from studying it. The frequency of thyroid conditions and the interests of my mentors contributed towards my focusing in this area. However, I can also recall how impressed I was when I read about the discovery of the therapeutic role of radioiodine in hyperthyroidism and thyroid cancer: a perfect marriage of physics and clinical medicine leading to the first “magic bullet” treatment in medicine.

Can you tell us a little about your work?

Graves’ orbitopathy (GO), also known as thyroid eye disease (TED), has been the focus of my clinical and academic interests. This has enabled me to work closely with colleagues in other disciplines, which has been immensely rewarding.

There are rapid advances in understanding the pathophysiology of GO, and a plethora of biologics are already available and beginning to be used with impressive results. Besides the high tech available, the realisation that low cost, conventional interventions can influence the course of this disease has also made the topic of implementation very interesting and challenging. Now is a fascinating time for people working in this area.

What do you think have been the most impactful advances in thyroid clinical practice and research?

For thyroid research, one of the most relevant outcomes of the Human Genome Atlas has been the demonstration that the commonest thyroid cancer (papillary) has one of the simplest genetic mutational repertoires, so the scope for therapeutic interventions to silence driver mutations is a realistic expectation. I anticipate that prognostic evaluations and novel thyroid cancer treatments will reach the clinical arena in the next decade as a direct result of this.

What will be the next breakthrough for treatment or diagnosis of thyroid conditions?

In my opinion, targeted therapies in advanced thyroid cancer are at the top of the list. Immunotherapies for autoimmune thyroid disease are also emerging. In basic research, we can expect to learn more about the application of regenerative medicine in thyroidology, and we will hear a lot more about the role of thyroid hormones in dementia.

What are the biggest challenges faced by your clinical specialty?

We need to reverse the tide of unnecessary investigations and treatments relating to endocrinology, as this has an enormous negative impact on patient care and wastes large amounts of resources. Another challenge is attracting the brightest doctors and scientists to our discipline, and strengthening the links between endocrinology as a clinical specialty and as a scientific area.

Are there any controversies in your practice area?

Some decades ago, we thought that we had solved the problem of thyroid hormone replacement. Yet, some patients remain dissatisfied, seek alternatives, and have recently launched a war against “conventional” endocrinologists. Unfortunately this is exacerbated by self-appointed experts from the dark alleys of alternative medicine, who exploit human suffering and desperation. However, on the bright side of things, this controversy has raised some valid research questions that are answerable by scientific investigation, and the new knowledge gained from it will help resolve some of these issues.

What do you enjoy about being a Network convenor?

I particularly enjoy the interaction with colleagues, especially the young ones. Endocrine networks have a great potential for bringing individuals with similar interests together and promoting research in endocrinology.

Do you have any words of wisdom for aspiring endocrinologists?

If you find endocrinology intriguing, delve into it and have a taste. Don’t be put off if it seems too complicated – it only means there is more to discover. Endocrinology is a great specialty full of surprises and rewards.

Find out more about the Society’s Endocrine Networks, and how they can provide a platform for knowledge exchange in your area of focus.

Meet the Endocrinologist: Dr Barbara McGowan, expert in obesity and bariatric surgery

Barbara McGowan is a consultant in diabetes and endocrinology at Guy’s and St Thomas’ in London, and a convenor of the Society’s Metabolic and Obesity Endocrine Network. Dr McGowan leads the obesity bariatric service at the hospital and her areas of research interest include gut hormones and remission of type 2 diabetes post-bariatric surgery.

What inspired you into endocrinology?

My initial biochemistry degree was inspired by a wonderful chemistry teacher. I had considered medicine at that time but the thought of a further five years in higher education was enough to suppress those feelings. I then tried my hand at selling my soul to the city and five years as an investment banker was enough to rekindle my spirit and courage to go to medical school. My love for molecules and metabolism made endocrinology an easy choice for me. I was lucky enough to stumble across Prof Meeran and Prof Bloom during my SHO years, who steered me towards a PhD in gut hormones and appetite control, which was supported by an MRC clinical fellowship. In 2009 I took a consultant post at Guy’s & St Thomas’ where I was tasked with developing a leading obesity service from scratch.

Tell us a little about your current clinical work

My work involves management of general and complex endocrinology, with a focus on hereditary endocrine disorders such as SDH disease and multiple endocrine neoplasia. As a lead for the medical obesity service, I also run a Tier 3/Tier 4 obesity service. My clinical research involves the running of several clinical trials on pharmacotherapy and metabolic surgery for the treatment of obesity. I am most excited about trying to understand mechanisms for weight loss and remission of type-2 diabetes post-bariatric surgery.

What do you think have been the most impactful advances in obesity and metabolism clinical practice?

From a clinical point of view, with the exception of metabolic surgery, we have had very little in terms of clinical advances for the treatment of obesity, which is quite surprising given that we have an epidemic of this disease. We have medication coming through but this is still not available in the NHS.

What do you think will be the next big breakthrough for treatment of obesity?

I am hoping that we will soon have much more effective pharmacological treatments that will include more powerful GLP-1 agonists and gut hormone combination therapies, to replicate outcomes from bariatric surgery, but without the surgery. The aspiration is to have better molecular markers that will help us to select patients likely to respond to different therapies.

What do you think are the biggest challenges faced by your clinical specialty?

Attracting high calibre trainees is big challenge. Endocrinology used to be considered an academic specialty, however service provision in NHS Trusts has become a burden that has detracted from the specialty. Furthermore, physicians wishing to pursue an academic career face funding challenges.

Are there any controversies in your practice area? How do you think they will be resolved?

Stigma regarding obesity is still rife, we need to educate the public, media and healthcare professionals and recognize obesity as a chronic disease. Until such time, prevention and treatment of obesity is unlikely to be prioritised.

What do you enjoy about being a Network convenor?

As a convenor, I am able to push the obesity agenda to help ensure it is well represented at SfE meetings. I was able to set up an annual Obesity Update conference at the Royal College of Physicians, and now run by Bioscientifica. The Network makes you part of an obesity family and allows like-minded people to get together and collaborate. Recently, I was able to use the Network to ask for opinion and support as to whether ‘Obesity should be recognized as a disease’. I would urge all members interested in obesity to join the network.

Do you have any words of wisdom for aspiring endocrinologists?

Endocrinology is a wonderful specialty, it spans many important organs and provides a diagnostic challenge for disease management. Do not be put off by the uncertainties and go for it! Speak to your mentors, friends and colleagues for advice, it is a friendly community. And for those interested in obesity as a specialty, sign up to the Network and I look forward to speaking to you!

The Endocrine Networks are platforms for knowledge exchange and collaboration amongst basic and clinical researchers, clinical endocrinologists and endocrine nurses. The Networks enable members to discuss and find solutions to challenges within their specialist field.

To join an Endocrine Network login to the ‘My profile’ section of the Members’ Area and select ’Endocrine Networks’.