Meet Specialist Registrar in Diabetes and Endocrinology, Dr Shazia Hussain

Dr Hussain is a specialist registrar in endocrinology and diabetes on the North East London Rotation and is currently working at the Royal London Hospital, Barts Health NHS Trust. Her passions are clinical endocrinology and diabetes, as well as medical education and training. Within the Society for Endocrinology, she is a member of the Early Career Steering Group, an SpR member of the Clinical Committee, a Leadership and Development Awards Programme Awardee and has recently joined the ‘Future of Endocrinology’ working group

Can you tell us about your current position?

I am a final year specialist registrar working in a busy east London teaching hospital. My day-to-day job involves a diverse mix of inpatient and outpatient work where I get to meet patients with acute and chronic endocrine and diabetes related conditions. I also partake in a full-time general medical on-call rota. The diversity in my current position means there are unlimited opportunities for me to learn from and share experiences with colleagues which I find immensely fulfilling.

What inspired you to specialise in endocrinology?

I have always enjoyed problem-solving medicine and so I guess it’s no surprise that I have ended up pursuing a career in endocrinology – an intellectually stimulating field that is the perfect balance of specialist and general medicine. However, my decision to specialise in endocrinology was made after working with some highly inspirational and encouraging endocrinologists whose enthusiasm and passion for their work was contagious! I was fascinated by the patient mix in the inpatient and outpatient setting and the detail with which their symptoms and results were dissected to make a diagnosis and ensure the delivery of holistic care. I feel extremely fortunate to have been exposed to specialist endocrinology and be inspired at such a crucial stage in my training and hope I can have the same impact on my junior colleagues!

Why is endocrinology an exciting field to enter?

Endocrinology is a constantly evolving field of medicine with numerous exciting and diverse opportunities to suit different individuals. Whether you are interested in clinical endocrinology, academia, leadership, education or a combination of these there is something for everyone.

I love the fact that I have been able to shape my training to gain experience in areas wider than clinical endocrinology, which has not only kept me motivated but also allowed me to positively contribute towards patient care in more ways than one. 

Furthermore, endocrinologists work closely with multiple other specialties (radiology, surgery, oncology, paediatrics and obstetrics to name a few), which means you have so much to offer your patients – many of whom you will care for over several years.

What has been a highlight of your training so far?

It’s hard for me to pick one highlight. My clinical training thus far has been an enjoyable mix of district general, teaching and tertiary centre work and allowed me to learn from numerous clinicians and members of the wider multi-disciplinary team. However, I am pleased that I chose not to follow the conventional training pathway and took time out of programme to pursue my passion for medical education, undertake a teaching fellowship and complete a MSc in medical education. I am particularly proud of being the first Endocrinology RCP Chief Registrar at St Bartholomew’s Hospital, which gave me excellent insight into NHS leadership and I hope has paved the path for future endocrine trainees who wish to explore this challenging yet rewarding area of medicine.

What are your ambitions for your future career?

I am hoping to complete my training within the next year – though the situation has been slightly less predictable given the COVID-19 pandemic! I am looking forward to taking on my first consultant post and hope to combine my clinical, medical education and leadership skills to deliver high-quality patient care. I’m motivated to attract undifferentiated trainees to pursue a career in endocrinology and also to represent diversity within NHS leadership.

Who do you most admire professionally?

I’ve learnt so much from so many of my colleagues and am hugely grateful for the time and efforts they have put into training me.

In particular, I owe a lot to my incredibly supportive training programme director, Professor Will Drake, whose passion for endocrinology and excellent clinical skills inspired me to become an endocrinologist and who I continue to learn so much from; and Professor Tahseen Chowdhury who has been an amazing mentor and always goes the extra-mile for his patients and trainees.

Any words of wisdom for aspiring endocrinologist out there?

Come and work with us! There’s so much to see and learn in endocrinology and diabetes and the opportunities to shape your training to suit your interests continue to grow. If you’re unsure about whether endocrinology is for you then definitely make contact – speak to your senior colleagues (SpRs, research / clinical fellows or consultants), attend the annual National Taster Day in Endocrinology and Diabetes and/or spend some time in our clinics to see what the job involves. It’s a brilliant speciality which I would highly recommend.

View career profiles of other endocrinologists on our dedicated page.

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